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in south florida as great a strain folks at entry point, there is science and progress of human trafficking. awareness part is important. they have to take the place when the internet for law enforcement because a lot of times they find themselves into prostitution and get treated as perpetrator rather than victims. if ecologists force them into a perpetrator but in fact we are the dems and they have to give him for certain judicial system to treat a women as victims and put them in a setting with a pull themselves away from drug addiction or whatever it's supposed appendices seem to keep them trapped. >> first i want to ask you a couple twitter questions that have come in what we've been talking here. one is who's the best meter in washington? >> robert griffing. [laughter] >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party? >> i think it was an election. it was a very close election when he looked than others and differences between. there is their free enterprise may maintain we need to improve on the way they connect those policies of the everyday life of everyday people.
. bill nye, the science guy, takes on global warming scoffer mark morano. >> this will be the hottest two decades in recorded history. >> bill nye has a bunch of scary predictions. >> plus the b word. bipartisan. everybody is talking about hands across the aisle in washington. do they really want to sever them? >> they are going to create people to come together on this and get it done. >> none of us want to see taxes on middle class folks go up. >> the president is very determined to try to prevent us from going over the fiscal cliff. >> those three guys are here live. and the man who shut down the government under bill clinton. what newt gingrich thinks it will take to avoid that happening again. >>> plus one of my personal heroes, the fastest man in the history of planet earth. jamaican sprinter usain bolt revealing a talent you may not know he has. ♪ let's get together and feel all right ♪ >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. our big story tonight, you are so hot, america. i mean that literally. the temperature was a balmy 60 degrees this afternoon in new york just
do you reconcile what science has established what what you may think your faith teaches. when it comes to the age of the earth, there is no conflict. god created the heavens and the earth and scientific advances has given us insight. but i believe he has done it. and i have reconciled that. but other people have a deeper thought. in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe and that means teaching them science. but also parents have the right to teach them theology and reconcile those two things as they see fit. that's the point the president was making back in 2007. so that's what i was saying. >> accepting that context, household is the earth? >> -- how old is the fourth, four and a half billion years old. god created it out of nothing. and science has given us insight as to how and when he did it. and the more science learns the more i'm convinced that god is real. >> you have had a very fascinating faith journey. you were baptized catholic and mormon and later to the catholic church. >> maybe i'm a theologian. and you go to mass an
. they produce products that and for public opinion, she policies, and advanced science, engineering, and madison. that question is complicated, and nrc leaders put together a panel of people that represented a broad range of disciplines. they convene the leaders from business and industry, academy, and government and the national laboratories. i had the privilege of being a member of that panel. because congress asked for 10 actions that to be taken to shore up universities, restructured our report around 10 recommendations with a time frame of the next 5-10 years. one recommendation focused on policies affecting the flow of international scholars and students to the u.s. more and more international students are inclined to come to our research universities. uva has had a 60% increase in such applications in the last three years alone. that has been fueled largely by applications from chinese students. the u.s. benefits when talented students and faculty come to the country to study and conduct research. the benefit even more if they stay in the u.s. to work after they graduate. it is in our nat
science, and they've waged an all-out attack on clean air laws of the. the top 25 senators who have received the most campaign cash from from, seven sitting here today on the environmental public works committees and big surprise. they are all republicans and they have all voted in favor of oil interests. john barasso, jim inhoff and lamar alexander have voted for fossil fuels 94% of the time. the koch brothers have given $60 million to groups that fund climate denial research including senator jim demint's new home the heritage foundation. right now, halfway across the world in doha qatar, world leaders are meeting for climate talks. according to a new report the koch's influence is being felt there as well. coming to us via skype from doha qatar, where it's the middle of the night is victor minadi, the executive director that did that report the international forum on globalization. victor, welcome inside "the war room"? >> hi. thanks for having me. >> you bet. thanks for staying up to bring the news to us. we heard what the koch brothers hav
. we don't see science of positive returns until 40 days. that's two months from now wekds positive returns on average. i think we have lower to go here. >> actually, i think you have fairly good seasonal strength in december and january through iphone sales. i think that's run with of the big catalysts for the company. you've got this product. you recently signed an agreement with sprint. you have t-mobile coming in next year. you have the carriers lining up and starting to sign. only two years ago you had one carrier, at&t. now you have four coming up. because it's been in decline so much, this is a good time to, you know, buy. maybe get a couple dollars cheaper. >> good conversation, guys. you both made good cases right now on a stock that everybody is watching these days. thanks for joining us. appreciate it very much. >> thank you. >> okay. we're in countdown mode. about half an hour away before we close up for the trading week. we're still holding on the dow. it's up about 52 points right now. the nasdaq is still dragging its feet compared to the other two indices. >>> and the
with science definitively established with what you may think -- for me when it comes to the age of the earth there is a concept a i believe god created the heavens and earth. i think the scientific advances have allowed us to have given us insight into when he did and how did you but i still believe god did. that's the i been able to reconcile that. other people have a keeper -- i think in america we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe. that means teaching them size. they have to know the science but also parents have the right to have theology and reconcile that. as they believe in secret. i think that's the point the president was making. back in 2007 when he was asked that question. that's what i was saying. >> we will accept it in the context. >> our faith, my faith says god created the universe. he created the beginning out of nothing. god created the heaven and the earth's. scientists have decided we needed and how he did it. the more sides learned, the more i'm convinced that god created it. [inaudible] >> later returned to the catholic church. spin
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: and in the impact segment tonight, we continue our analysis on the murder suicide in kansas city with an emphasis on the excuse culture here now monica crowley and alan colmes. do you accept the premise we are living in a country that accept bracing excuse-making? >> i think in many cases that's true. >> bill: whoa. medic? [ laughter ] do we have somebody? >> i am here to give you that reaction. >> bill: i'm glad. >> i think it's true. what you said is accurate in that it is personal responsibility. >> bill: yep. >> it rests with him. >> bill: why do you think colmes a guy like bob costas. i talked to him today. it's very interesting and i hope you tune in tomorrow to see him. it's not what you think it is. why do you think that his commentary which is the most powerful and widely watched of anybody, all right? didn't zero in on personal responsibility and, instead, went into the gun culture? >> i can't speak for him. >> bill: why do you think he did it. >> he probably does feel that what whitlock said resonated that
. this ain't rocket science. it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision is made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent the middle class tax cut. the president would probably have me spin up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. it can be done like that. it is not complicated. >> vice president joe biden did not waiver on the white house's position. it's all about the top tax rates. >> every serious economist i have spoken to, left, right, and center, knows you have to do something about revenue and rates. you can't get there from here without affecting people at this table. or fooling around with the mortgage deductions. you can't get there without the rates being affected. >> the white house is not backing down on rates. the president sent his legislative affairs director to meet with the republicans on the hill. he told him the white house is not moving on rates. a source close to the negotiations said once republicans move on rates they can get a deal very quickly. that sounds like the president is ready to move. the only person who has shown an
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. well, having a t of lotions doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] breakrom the holiday stress. fedex office. >> western as a big winner. nicole petallides on the floor of the stock exchange. tell us y. nicole: always been to give out winners when people are invested in initial public offerings and take a look at western gas. jumped nearly 30%, the pipeline operator and they have their ipo and certainly a lot of strong demand for this particular stock. master limited partnership and this is an example of that and operates in energy infrastructure rent paid their earnings. it certainly was one with high demand an
. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done. what it free men and women can achieve when imagination joins a common purpose. host: his inaugural address from january 2009. the question is, as the president moves to a second term, what is your number one priority? the number one agenda item you think he needs to address? danny is joining us from west virginia on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the first issue and the core of all of our problems is the free trade we have been engaging in for the last 20 years. if you look at the jobs numbers and how long it takes to recover from the sessions, the clear issue is our jobs have
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we'll kick off opening bell in a minute in a half. stocks had good action in shanghai overnight. a four-week high. the only disappointment has been data in europe. the scuttlebutt that some members wanted to cut which has put pressure on the euro today. >> german market up twice what we're up and i think people are shaking their heads that netherlands could be up. we don't see any data whatsoever that europe is doing better but belief that 2013 can't be as bad as 2012. german numbers were not good at all. it's a puzzle. >> we did get an earthquake in northeastern japan overnight. 7.3 is serious. looks like we dodged a bullet on that front as well. doesn't look like there's any damage as a result of that. >> i thought there would be a tremendous rebuilding effort in fukushima. it didn't happen because the ground is contaminated. the first question they asked over there were nuclear reactors apparently safe is the early word. >> we walk in on monday
we have a more sort of science based and intellectually based argument about, you know, the harmful environmental effects versus the economic benefits and come up with the stuff chris is talking about the disclosure on how it's done. there has to be a mechanism of how to do that. >> a lot is behind the curtain of proprietary information. the second thing about the economic benefits of this, mine one is, it's driving down the cost of electricity and it's killing the coal industry from my perspective someone primarily cared about the climate, that's great. coal is a nasty substance. it's bad for people's lungs, bad for the climate, et cetera. driving costs so low it's crowding out renewables. this other effect that can be bad. in terms of jobs, we have the highest levels of employment in natural gas and oil extraction since 1992. the total jobs in extraction 200,000. not creating a lot of jobs in the industry. >> you're going to have more on your show this weekend, my friend. >> tomorrow. >> a little tease. >> tomorrow there's going to be an in depth conversation of fracking. >> and i
people. folks, this is not hard. this ain't rocket science. it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision is made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent middle- class tax cuts. the president would probably have me sprint up the hill to bring the bill back down to be signed. it is not complicated. it is not complicated. it does not even require a republican friends to say we agree that we should raise taxes on the top 2%. all its says is decoupled. let us take care of business and let us vote on the others, but do not hold hostage the relief for the middle class because you insist that 120,000 families get a $500 billion tax cut over 10 years. i have no idea the party affiliations. i expect a democrat over here. [laughter] beyond that, i am not going to guess. anyway, thank you, guys, very much. we have taken care of your lunch. this is a big deal. this i can afford. thank you very much for taking the time. we are prepared and the president has made a clear and the secretary geithner has made it clear, there are two requirements. one, the top brackets have to g
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you have set an example. our country has to be prepared to protect its supporters whether it is from the military or other kinds of encouragement or as the establishment of a program that says if you build and live here, that your route should not be taken away from you without the government helping to restore things. one of the questions i thought about when i heard you had this assignment is how much you had to do with this. it may take a long time to solve the problem. we commend you for your work. ad
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. gethe mercedes-benz on your wi list at the winter event going o w thugh december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a sta tboot! [huckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >> all right. we're just a few seconds from the opening bell. i'll repeat the news of the day. 7.7% unemployment. that's the rate for the month of november. 146,000 jobs created overall. look within the numbers, 350,000 people dropped out work force in one month alone. that accounts for the drop in the unemployment rate. now, that news was out precisely one hour ago. when that news was released, stock futures took a flip up. we should be opening this day with a gain for the dow in
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> financial capital of the world. we're counting down the opening bell on a tuesday morning. we should note the move in the commodities market this morning. look at gold for instance. breaking 1,700 at one point. one-month lows breaking near term support of 1700. oil also down a buck on wti more than at this point. >> we do have that euro that's been hanging in. some people think it's because of the euro. other people feel that everything goes down in a fiscal cliff situation. i mean, commodities are saying we're going to go over the cliff. that's what i think. >> it's interesting. there are these recent reports tallying how many american eagle gold coins americans are buying. is that the ultimate safe haven trade. if americans are buying gold coins in record numbers, the strongest sales since 1998, and it's not just seasonality here. it's interesting. >> i own some. i own silver. >> silver and gold. >> you can buy silver and gold. you can actually -- there's a big ma
: coming up, you hear about it all the time. seniors falling victim to fraud. now there is science that explains why. then he was the first living person to be awarded the medal of honor in decades. he's telling his story. he's hanging out with pete, the guy who got his home fixed after the storm [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? often comes with a set of equally impressive instructions ? shouldn't something that's truly advanced, not need much explanation at all ? with the nokia lumia 822 on verizon, there's not much to learn because it's powered by windows... to let you do more than you ever imagined on your smartphone. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of your plan. only on verizon. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and mo
. caller: c-span could put on actual science. i think there is a lot of magical thinking on the part of democrats here. first of all, they are assuming if they raise the taxes on this one%, it will not affect the jobs and the companies that they work for. nor would it affect the customers they have. what are the percentages of the most important job creators around? how did you identify them? they had no clue. i think the other aspect of magical thinking is that in the noise and the signal, nate silver pointed out previously a 12% rise in gdp might ake for a 2% rise in employment. in 2005, we got 3.5 million jobs lost. it is a fantasy to believe that the president's spending is going to make employment rise more. recently, there has been an article by a harvard university law professor who says if you are going to do this thing, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raisi
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
is the telecommunications industry. one of the reasons as a computer science major i would argue, one of the reasons that the telecommunications, technology industry has been so successful, is because the government hasn't figured out how to regulate it and slow it down. yet here you have a proposal by the united nations coming out of the united nations to interfere with that multistakeholder organization that's been and allowed this industry to be so successful and allowed the internet to shape and dramatically improve so many people's lives. so many of the things that we can do today and all the conveniences that have been added through great new apps and technology have come from this multistakeholder governance of the internet. yet here you have the united nations trying to step in and let's be real clear about who some of these countries are that want to do this and what they are intending to do if they were to be successful. countries like russia and china are leading this. some of the arab nations right now, where you see uprisings, many of those uprisings have been brought through social med
could lose their jobs and science and public research grants could be cut including in to cancer and childhood diseases. fewer americans could receive drug abuse treatment and $700 million slashed from the epa budget. cutting back of food inspection. disaster relief, omb says, quote, the federal emergency management administration's ability to respond would be undermined. and finally, from border patrol to hiring new fbi agents, correction officers, federal prosecutors, all could be scaled back. now, all of these cuts, brooke, don't happen exactly at 12:01 a.m. on january 2nd. they happen over the course of a year. but agencies are preparing for an impasse in washington. this is exactly, exactly what policymakers are trying to avoid. brooke? >> thank you. >>> shock waves in washington today. powerful republican senator calling it quits. south carolina's senator jim demint will be stepping down december 31st to lead the heritage foundation. that's a powerful conservative think tank in d.c. demint says he can be more effective outside the senate. >> a lot of my role in the senate h
becomes an art and not a science at all. >> will you promise to come back on in two years and three months? >> i will promise to do that. hopefully, these numbers will look more cheer. what we'll be able to see then is the trend. we do know there are upward revisions to the employment data coming through from early preliminary estimates that the labor department has given us. that may be better news next year when they release that data. >> diane swonk, nice to have you. >> can christine go back to listening to gangnam style and listening to the news off twitter? >> 13.2% for blacks, down a little bit. whites is 6.8. >> still double digits. >> structural disparity is so disturbing. >>> zoraida sambolin has other storiy ies making news for us. >> ballistic missile by the north koreans. uss fitzgerald is a guided missile destroyer. navy officials won't say exactly where they are located. north korea appears to be moving toward a missile launch later this mon month. retired navy sailor is facing espionage charges. robert patrick hoffman tried to pass classified information about tracking u.s.
of these laws are 20 years old. you know how much we learned about -- in terms of the science. it just makes no sense in some of these states because it doesn't fit with what we know. >> i know you are not an attorney but -- i think you can answer this. how responsible -- i mean, the person -- each individual if you are a consenting adult, aren't you responsible for yourself and having safe sex with someone else even if you don't know -- >> sure. >> -- your status? you are responsible for yourself as a human being. >> absolutely. when you -- dig deeply into these laws and read them they obviously talk about that. but ultimately if somebody knows their stat us and don't disclose it, this is where the laws are focused. that's why so many people -- young people, are not getting tested. they don't want to know. >> the first man in the piece, his partner never got hiv. >> did you saw what his life was like. locked up, all of that. person we are talking about did not get the virus. >> thank you. great story. >> thank you. >> appreciate i. >> you can see more reporting from sanjay this weekend. sat
actual science and claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that use and share data at the point of care, to improve expwrowt comes, -- outcomes, lower cost, and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates delivery, data support for clinicians, pharmaceuticals, and wellness and productivity platforms. in many ways, our model is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20-30 years ago. today's simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated model that emphasizes primary care that can provide outcomes or the cost of care, and, especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs including the patients in the medicare and medicaid programs. the con cement relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care, the right place, at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today, data analytics capab
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)